David Crosby On Finding His Happy Place Without CSN Or Y (Playing GAMH on Sun. 4/30)

David Crosby is alone again following yet another fallout with his partners in harmony, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash (and sometimes Neil Young). Having once taken 21 years between solo albums, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame double inductee (once with the Byrds, once with Crosby, Stills & Nash) is now prepping his third new release is three years, “Sky Trails.” The rock album follows last year’s acoustic collection, “Lighthouse,” which was produced by Michael League of Snarky Puppy. Crosby, 75, spoke to the San Francisco Chronicle  from his home in Santa Ynez.

 Q: You go two decades between solo records and now you’re on a roll. What’s going on?

A: I don’t know. I can’t get my act together to do it on a regular basis. I think the main thing is I left CSN. It was a great band — we did some great work — but it wasn’t a happy thing. It got to a point where we didn’t like each other, and you don’t want that to spoil music for you. Getting out of there opened the floodgates for new material. I’m at a very good place in my life.

Q: I’m happy to hear that, because it took a lot of years of suffering for you to get here.

A: Me, too. The suffering was mostly my fault. Getting out of it and getting here, I finally realized I was given this talent and I shouldn’t have been wasting time screwing around. I should have been working this whole time.

Q: Your voice sounds out of this world on “Lighthouse.” What are you gargling with?

A: Truthfully, I just don’t know. I can hear it, too. There isn’t any reason I should be singing well, but I am. I think, “Wow, I better use the s— out of this while I got it.” Which is what I’m trying to do. I think it’s a great record. It’s completely different than the “Sky Trails” record, which is the next one.

Q: Are you totally shredding on that one?

A: It’s definitely electric. There’s horns, keyboards, lead guitar. The rehearsals are going extremely well. I was singing “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” yesterday and I’ve got my eyes closed. We get to the end and somebody starts applauding and I turn around and it’s Paul McCartney. He and his entire band are sitting there on our couch because they were rehearsing next door. He said, “Play us another!” It was a great affirmation.

Q: This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love. When you look at the state of the country, do you feel like it all amounted to nothing?

A: I don’t think it was for nothing. We did manage to stop the Vietnam War, and we did some good work for civil rights. Music is a great tool for propagating ideas. Ideas are the most powerful thing on the planet. Underline that. I think this abysmal mess in Washington and these disgusting people infesting government are going to inspire some really good art.

Tickets are still available for An Evening With David Crosby & Friends at GAMH on Sun. 4/30!