Pardoner’s ‘Uncontrollable Salvation’ Is A Punk Blessing That Bludgeons (Playing Fri. 8/25 at Slim’s)


Pardoner can't stop saving us from 'blah' punk. That's what Uncontrollable Salvation means, right? Or maybe Pardoner's some kind of Judge Dredd, a combination of judge, jury and savior whenever a perp is making lame punk crossed with '90s alt-rock.

 In any case, the San Francisco band's debut album is a muscle spasm of Polvo's weirdo heft and Dinosaur Jr.'s slacker fuzz, set to a disaffected punk squall. It's a blessing that bludgeons, much like this title track that simultaneously squeals with nasty delight and catchy corkscrew hooks. Uncontrollable Salvation comes out Sept. 8 via Father/Daughter Records. - NPR

Watch Our Exclusive Premiere of Grieves’ The Weeknd-Like Jam ‘Gutz’ (Playing Fri. 9/1 at Slim’s)


grieves

About midway through Grieves’ woozy “Gutz,” you find yourself falling into sync with the track. There’s some weird alchemy, like maybe Grieves has found the mid-point between The Weeknd, Bryson Tiller and acid jazz, that happens and you’re suddenly muttering “fuck you” along with the song’s hook. 

The song, off Running Wild, the Seattle-based rapper’s fifth proper full length, sees Grieves hit on something like the zeitgeist. Naturally, there’s plenty of broken glass, a young woman in lingerie, some knifeplay and even a surprise murder. Never say that your friends at Playboy bring you boring music videos.

Grieves tells us that the song is about never being able to get enough of another person.

“When it comes down to the matters of the heart, people can be just as addicting as any drug,” he says. “We tell ourselves ‘never again’, then we wake up in the same bed we promised we’d never return to. It’s complicated and intoxicating. That’s why this video complements this song so well.”

Listen to the song below.

Running Wild will be out August 25th via Rhymesayers Entertainment. Pre-order the album here - Playboy

Broke-Ass Stuart Has Your Chance To Win Tickets To Shabazz Palaces on Fri. 8/18!


shabazz

I’m super excited to bring you this giveaway because I love me some Shabazz Palaces. So, please don’t enter this giveaway if you intend on flaking. I will be sad.

Shabazz Palaces is an American hip hop duo from Seattle composed of Ishmael Butler a.k.a. Palaceer Lazaro (formerly Butterfly of jazz rap group Digable Planets) and multi-instrumentalist Tendai “Baba” Maraire, son of mbira master Dumisani Maraire. The pair anonymously self-released two EPs, Eagles Soar, Oil Flows and The Seven New (referred to as Shabazz Palaces and Of Light, respectively) in 2009 before becoming the first hip-hop act to be signed to the Sub Pop label and releasing their debut full-length album, Black Up to wide critical acclaim in 2011.

Butler notes that the work of Shabazz Palaces differs from his previous work stylistically. He cites his primary influences as “abstract,” pulling from podcasts and mixtapes. Butler attributes the use of African percussion and jazz overtones to his family’s musical preferences.

Enter to win HERE! 

Hot Lunch: Local Heavy Rock Heroes Headline Slim’s (Sat. 8/19)


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This Saturday, Hot Lunch headlines it’s biggest Bay Area show yet with this concert at Slim’s in San Francisco. The quartet will be joined by local destructo psych-punks CCR Headcleaner — who have established a solid reputation with their feral live shows — and Frisco, a new group featuring singer Bob McDonald and bassist/guitarist Andy Oglesby of sadly defunct punk vets Hank IV with ex-Acid King/Altamont drummer Joey Osbourne and onetime Lost Goat guitarist Eric Peterson that hints at the noisy ’90s chaos of the Jesus Lizard and Unsane.

Read the CBS preview HERE! 

Wu Wednesday Playlist (To Get You Ready For GZA Here At Slim’s on Fri. 8/11!)


When it comes to thought provoking, street-bred raw lyricism, the Wu-Tang Clan's fountain of wisdom, GZA takes his job very seriously. The way he crafts his double-edged rhyme flow mirrors the skill and precise technique of one who works with fine ceramics. GZA's metaphoric and multi-layered lyrics are often touted by critics as his rap name implies: genius.

Get your tickets for Friday's show with GZA + Sims HERE! 

Art And Mortality On The Bill For Great American Music Hall Event (With Major Powers & The Lo-Fi Symphony & Midtown Social on Fri. 8/11)


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Every month, Ned Buskirk gathers 50 people together in a cavernous room to talk about the one thing no one seems to want to talk about: death.

These open mikes, aptly called “You’re Going to Die: Poetry, Prose, and Everything Goes,” started seven years ago in Buskirk’s Duboce Park living room. Now, they exist as one of the only places San Franciscans can cry comfortably in a room full of strangers.

On Friday, Aug 11, at 8 p.m., the YG2D collective stages its biggest event to date: a blowout show at the Great American Music Hall. Unlike its regular open mikes, this show will be curated with performers tuned toward the beauties and sorrows of mortality.

For tickets and more information, go to YG2D’s website at www.yg2d.com - SF Gate 

Album Review: Make Them Suffer – Worlds Apart (Playing Slim’s on Tues. 8/15 with Enterprise Earth & Spite)


Make-Them-Suffer-Worlds-Apart

Make Them Suffer
Worlds Apart
(Rise Records)

Australia’s Make Them Suffer refuse to stagnate. With their astoundingly great third record, Worlds Apart, the band have cemented their ability to continually reinvent themselves successfully. In fact, despite leaving the blackened deathcore style of their beloved debut, Neverbloom, almost entirely behind, Make Them Suffer’s latest features some of the group’s most complex and heavy material yet. By leaning hard into their gothic and space rock influences (and fully utilizing new keyboardist/backing vocalist Booka Nile), Worlds Apart is a real winner, with two hallmarks of the band’s shape-shifting career on full display: impressive storytelling and a haunting ambiance. By now, it’s clear that Make Them Suffer are one of the most adventurous modern metalcore bands around.

Naturally, Worlds Apart has an ethereal, other-worldly sound, but it’s the group’s understanding of balance that makes this such a special record. New keyboardist Booka Nile’s brooding vocals are all over the record, yet they are never overused, and the standard, cookie-cutter clean choruses are mostly eschewed. Also, while Nile’s keyboard work is impressive, it’s used sparingly, more an accent than a feature; that’s a wise choice. Likewise, Worlds Apart is decidedly a heavy and technical record, with choppy, mosh-ready sections all over; however, breakdowns and knuckle-dragging moments are rare. Instead, the heavy aspects are a colorful texture in creating the atmosphere of a mosh pit at the International Space Station. Sean Harmanis’ emotional and honest lyrics give an added weight to the proceedings, not that World Apart needs more weight.

Ultimately, Make Them Suffer’s third record may go down as the best metalcore record of 2017. The band have proven, no matter what their chosen style, they are equally powerful and effective in crafting weighty heavy tunes that stay with the listener. It’s all topped off by the most compelling song in the band’s catalog – “Save Yourself” – an uplifting, powerful ode to pushing through with the things that fulfill you. With Worlds Apart, Make Them Suffer are clearly on another level.

Purchase the album here.

 - New Noise Magazine

Watch Our Exclusive Premiere of Grieves’ The Weeknd-Like Jam ‘Gutz’ (Playing Slim’s on Fri. 9/1 with Dem Atlas)


Corrected

About midway through Grieves’ woozy “Gutz,” you find yourself falling into sync with the track. There’s some weird alchemy, like maybe Grieves has found the mid-point between The Weeknd, Bryson Tiller and acid jazz, that happens and you’re suddenly muttering “fuck you” along with the song’s hook.

The song, off Running Wild, the Seattle-based rapper’s fifth proper full length, sees Grieves hit on something like the zeitgeist. Naturally, there’s plenty of broken glass, a young woman in lingerie, some knifeplay and even a surprise murder. Never say that your friends at Playboy bring you boring music videos.

Grieves tells us that the song is about never being able to get enough of another person.

“When it comes down to the matters of the heart, people can be just as addicting as any drug,” he says. “We tell ourselves ‘never again’, then we wake up in the same bed we promised we’d never return to. It’s complicated and intoxicating. That’s why this video complements this song so well.”

Listen to the song below.

Running Wild will be out August 25th via Rhymesayers Entertainment. - Playboy

Actual Wolf Debuts New Video For “Baby Please” (Playing Slim’s on Thurs. 8/10 with Jon Wolfe & Sarah Summer)


Grand Rapids indie-folk artist Eric Pollard, known by his stage name Actual Wolf, has shared a new video for his tune “Baby Please,” a hazy, soulful rocker off his recently released album Faded Days. 

Directed by fellow Minnesota native Erik Nelson, the “Baby Please” visual follows a contemporary Bonnie-and-Clyde couple on the road as they revel in the exhilaration of robbing banks, shooting guns, and eluding the police. 

In considering Pollard’s recent brush with the law and fairly itinerant lifestyle—travelling between Duluth, MN, Brooklyn, Nashville, and Oakland over the years—it is not difficult to interpret the video’s subtext as containing some personal resonance.

“It is important to relax, view the work, take in its finer points, and draw your conclusions as to its motives/themes,” says Pollard. “Thank you and enjoy. Stay wavy.”

Faded Days features collaborations with Al Church, Jeremy Hanson, Jake Hanson, Steve Garrington, and Ditch Kurtz, and is out now on cassette and digital platforms. The album is slated for a vinyl release September 15 via Red House Records. - American Songwriter

John Craigie’s Troubadour Tale (Playing GAMH on Sat. 11/11 with The Sam Chase)


john craigie

Written all over his album reviews, Wikipedia page, and his own website biography, the word “troubadour” is used to characterize folk musician John Craigie. The frequent use of this description is understandable. “Troubadour” aptly emphasizes the vivid storytelling that appears in Craigie’s music, though it evokes a rather antiquated image of a wandering poet that fails to capture the lively nature of Craigie’s performances. In his most recent album, No Rain, No Rose, Craigie alternates between stripped-down acoustic guitar and a full instrumental band to supplement his lyrics, whose topics reveal Craigie’s perspective on everything from past lovers to more abstract concepts, like what it means to find home.

Craigie has released eight albums — including two cover records —and has toured all over the country, but this summer marks the first time he is performing with fellow acoustic artist and friend Jack Johnson. Before his show at the Greek Theatre this week, SF Weekly spoke with Craigie about his transition from teaching math to pursuing music, living and working with his folk singer friends in Portland, and trying to write songs that are neither painstakingly forced nor lazy.

Click HERE for the SF Weekly's interview, and pick up your tickets for Sat. 11/11 soon!

Rex Suru & Cherubim Vibes Make Their US Debut At Slim’s This Friday! (7/28)


Rex Suru & Cherubim Vibes are an Afro-roots Reggae band from Nigeria. The band was formed by Rex Suru in 2012 in Lagos, Nigeria. Blending the West African rhythmic Afro-beat with Jamaican Ska Reggae, Rex Suru & Cherubim Vibes are the quintessential showcase of Afro-roots Reggae. The music promotes spiritual, political, and social themes; at its core, it is pulsating and moving. All songs are original compositions by Rex Suru. The band will be performing in the United States for the first time Summer 2017 (including their very first US performance here at Slim's on Fri. 7/28!)

Kevin Morby Sings of a Haunting LA on ‘City Music,’ Hits GAMH in September (Sat. 9/23 w/ Shannon Lay)


KevinMorby

Former Woods bassist Kevin Morby has in recent years enjoyed widespread praise for his flourishing, prolific solo career. He’d previously played in the Babieswith Cassie Ramone of Vivian Girls. The duo put out a couple of excellent albums before the project was declared inactive.

Since the end of the Babies and his departure from Woods, Morby has kept busy. 2013’s Harlem River marked the start of a slew of releases: four albums in five years, all of which display nuanced songcraft and a rambling folk imagination. But it was last year’s Singing Saw that won him significant acclaim, helped along by favorable coverage from the influential blog Aquarium Drunkard.

Morby’s songs have always tended towards the mournful. Singing Saw is an album of the wilderness: ballads for the somber forests, mystical desert wanderings, folksy hymns of the mountains, and of lost souls. His latest, City Music (out on Dead Oceans) embraces new geographies while allowing Morby’s Kansas roots shine through. City Music plays like an elegy for LA, as the singer-songwriter is wooed by its charms without losing his outsider’s eye for its uglier facets. On album opener “Come To Me Now,” Morby sings “I can’t wait for the sun to go down / Tired of squintin’ at this godawful town.” Over the course of the album, he collages together religious atonement, rock and roll love stories, and the seediness of the forbidding, alienating metropolis. It’s a juxtaposition that crops up often in film, literature, and music alike — a gothic rendering of LA’s sun-baked sprawl.

The narration that opens the title track’s music video intones: “Each night, each bar had a band playing music. And the music was electric. Different than the music back home. As this wasn’t music from the country—but from the city.” Arguably Morby's best work yet, the slow and wistful City Music is a lovely and lovelorn take on the classic trope of country-boy-in-the-big-city. Pick up a copy and bask in some of its melancholy beauty. - The Bay Bridged

Fanna-Fi-Allah (Sun. 7/9 at GAMH)


In this time of religious extremism, there are still those who are carrying the flame of religious tolerance, devotion and mysticism - and the Sufis are some of the most ancient.

Fanna-Fi-Allah carries the tradition and teachings of the Sufis in their music, the devotionally driven and passionate music of Qawwali. Through many years of study and practice under the guidance of Qawwali masters of India and Pakistan, their expression of Qawwali music has become an authentic representation and continuation of this ancient tradition of Sufi music.

Bea Miller Gets Colorful In 2017 Album Releases (Playing GAMH on Mon. 6/26 w/ Latitude)


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Maplewood, N.J.-raised, Los Angeles-based actress, singer-songwriter Bea Miller has adopted an intriguing record-release strategy. The former “X-Factor” contestant issued her full-length debut “Not An Apology” in 2015, but this year she’s putting out a series of color-coded EPs: “Chapter One: Blue,” “Chapter Two: Red” and the upcoming “Chapter Three: Yellow.” “I have synesthesia,” she explains. “It’s essentially when you can see music in color. So ‘Blue’ is the songs I wrote when I was feeling sad and lost, ‘Red’ was written when I was going through a stage of empowerment, and I’m writing ‘Yellow’ right now, about the light at the end of the tunnel.”

You were raised by two showbiz moms. How cool was that?

It’s been awesome having two moms. I grew up in a town where everyone for the most part was very accepting, and there were a lot of LGBT families there. So I’m lucky to have grown up where I did, because there are a lot of places in the world where people are still having problems with things like that. And I was lucky to have experienced something that was different, kind of outside the box. Plus, having two bad-ass moms that didn’t take s— from anybody has helped me become the person I am.

So you weren’t afraid to recently call out electronic duo The Chainsmokers on Twitter, saying they only made music to meet models. Which was hilarious.

Yeah. And a lot of people just took that too seriously. A lot of times I’ll say things like that, and people get kind of angry with me. But I think a lot of people actually agree with me, because it is kind of hilarious that these two guys who are very frat-boy-ish are so successful in a very feminist world — it’s interesting, to me, that they can get by with this.

What sexism have you witnessed in the music business?

Well, if you’re a guy in music, you can be anything. You can be cute, you can be weird, you can be any style of human being, and as long as people like your voice, they’ll listen to you. But if you’re a woman, unless you’re really beautiful, like a model, you’ll have a hard time finding success. I’m not model-beautiful, like a Rihanna or a Selena Gomez, but I’m also not super weird, either. And so far, I’ve struggled with that. And I feel like a lot of women have that problem, where they have to over-sexualize themselves or do things that are weird and different. I don’t feel good about that, and I tweeted about it. I mean, you don’t see guys running around, shaking their asses in music videos! - SF Examiner

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